Who is Haba

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Hello,

my name is

Patricia Glez Kasaeva,

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I was born in Havana, I was raised halfway between Cuba and Russia, although in general I have to say, looking from a distance, that my basic education can be included in the so-called communist indoctrination method. Extracting the catastrophe from this title, it is an education based on solidarity and the importance of the whole rather than the individual.

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I did my university education in Barcelona, ​​first a career in Art History and later a master’s degree in Urban Studies, which is a theoretical approach to urbanism especially from a sociological point of view.

My experience working in art began with the internship archive contact at the Tapiés Foundation where I learned to look at the work of curators, producers and the entire museum bureaucratic structure from the documentation. Later I worked with a good friend in an industrial design studio between the 50s and 70s, especially discovering pieces, documenting them, restoring them and ready for commercial circulation. There I learned to manage a large inventory and above all to sharpen the eye to find the authentic among so many copies. Shortly after, by chance in life, I started in the art market through the front door with some works that a great friend had at his house and wanted to sell. I had to start myself in this world in a self-taught way and surrounded myself with experienced professionals from whom to absorb knowledge and practices. Once I had learned what I believed to be enough, I began to “work” (I put it in quotes because I didn’t have a salary but charged by commission) with an emerging artist with no money but whose work I fell in love with and continue to love. After two years of a very enriching collaboration, I moved to Cuba and worked for a cultural magazine that was dedicated to current affairs on Cuban culture inside and outside the island. There I soaked up the roots that I had half lost with my years in Europe and I got in touch with the Cuban cultural show business (especially contemporary art). When I returned to Barcelona, ​​between August and November 2018, I created Haba Gallery.

Outside of these more structural professional experiences, I have worked in multiple artistic events as a producer.

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For me, art is a great drawer of concerns. An absolutely free space that uses aesthetics to put issues on the table, which are part of our daily life and our contemporaneity, more or less universal, that produce emotional and / or rational reactions. Said reactions will allow the viewer to attribute to the work their own concern regarding the theme being worked on, generating a symbiosis of creator-public opinions.

Put more simply, art, among other things, is a great weapon of communication with the ability to challenge the status quo and advance both society and the individual. Taking into account that artists have the sensitivity that allows them to know what is going to happen and they tell us about it through their works.

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By definition I am an art idealist, so I understand that the commodification of art is its own form of prostitution. But at the same time I understand that being an artist, in addition to everything that involves the “divine” of sensitivity, is a profession that like any other needs an economy to sustain it.

I decide to work with artists because I love art and I find it absolutely necessary in this world, especially with the unhuman and selfish evolution that we have chosen as a society. I am not a pessimist, quite the opposite, that is why I work on art from its quality of balancing our evolution, of mutual approach and growth of our humanization. I also decide to work with artists because I like them (hahaha), I really enjoy their conversations and their crazy things (without falling into the absurd clichés), I enjoy when they unburden themselves in their cosmic, abstract and unintelligible theories, I enjoy abstracting myself to try to understand them. I enjoy when the most absolute clarity is presented to them almost as a revelation or sometimes as an incoherence. I enjoy watching them work and I enjoy helping them continue to do so.

That is why I focus on emerging ones, since starting a career in the art world is a difficult path that often becomes tortuous and even precarious. It is true that the supply of emerging art is very wide and the demand not so much. It is a small-door market in which only a few will succeed in sitting on the throne of economic stability. I think that there is not enough supply since the ability to empathize with an artistic piece is as subjective as the expression itself.

In my personal case, and with Haba Gallery, what I motivate is the creation of a personal collection that responds to the subjective concept of each collector’s art. Thus, her ability to actively intervene in the world of art will be through what her collection and her criteria are capable of making the concept of Art evolve (in capital letters). Working with young collectors (or Millennials) in this sense is an advantage because they buy art to define who they are or as a symbol of their personality, in the same way they choose music, a piece of furniture or their twitter cover. Their impulse to buy is based on emotion, aesthetic taste and knowledge, thus becoming an excellent tool for cleaning up the art market ecosystem, turning their collections into a reflection of their specificities, experiences, empathies, beliefs and claims.

A well-assembled collection can be a great tool for transmitting historical knowledge, promoting new ideas and reflections.

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The artist will have more reputation the more times he sees his name written. At first through awards and contests, then through group exhibitions, then personal ones, sales, and the number of times you see your name in the media. Many consecrated galleries, such as Gagosian, Saatchi, Malborough or Esther Arias in Spain also cache artists just for having works in their collection, in the same way that they sell works to important private collections, which on many occasions will be loaned to different exhibitions around the globe. All this career in which the artist’s cache will increase and what will be introduced in the Art Price archives of contemporary art.

The gallery owner in this process has different responsibilities. In general, the contacts, either with collectors who will buy the work, often because of the trust and authority that the gallery owner has generated throughout his career, and on the other hand, through contact with exhibition projects, curators, etc. . and of course to appear at fairs.

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I do not feel qualified to speak of justice in these terms. For me, a good work of art must meet different criteria: artistic quality (which does not necessarily mean technical quality, depending on the language and artistic style on which it works, this varies), originality (or rarity) of its central thesis ( be it thematic, experimentation, conceptuality, actuality or even ways of presenting information from the world, in the case of a storyboard for example) and justification (the work must be accompanied by a solid statement, which has been meditated and questioned by multiple forms by the artist himself) and finally universality (even taking into account that a work can be empathetic in a global or local way, in both cases it must contribute to the knowledge of the thesis it addresses).

In addition to these criteria, fashion is a great factor that makes a work have one price or another. These fashions are marked especially by cultural movements at a global level that make one area of ​​the world or political position more interesting than another for periods of time.

Last but not least, when evaluating a work we will inevitably look at who the artist is. This question of the value for the firm lies in the artist’s career and the ability that he has had throughout his creations to evolve as the world evolves, that is, not to stagnate in past fashions and still preserve his style, his brand and of course your line of thought. It is clear that the concerns of yesterday, today will not be as important as the concerns of today, but both concerns, those of yesterday and those of today, must be coherent and symptomatic of the artist’s own history.

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As I have explained to you previously, the subjectivity of art allows everyone to appreciate it, but it is true that the ideas that many people have about art today were anchored in the formal, iconological and thematic parameters prior to the 19th century, while the artistic creation and its market have been on their own ever since. The avant-gardes of the twentieth century and postmodernity turned the way we understand art upside down and today an artist is further away from being a craftsman and closer to being a philosopher, hence the new evaluation criteria essentially lie in the originality of the thesis.

Currently an artist is not allowed to work for a client (that is, on request) as it used to be in the past, but the creative fact is based on the deep freedom and creative vagaries of genius.

So collecting, more than ever, has become a feature of absolute sensitivity, subjectivity and at the same time a high degree of intellectuality. It takes a lot of art to see.

No, obviously not all collectors have this training since these same parameters (and Andy Warhol) have made the art market a very profitable field of speculation. But what is clear is that these collectors, who do not know what they are paying, rely on great experts who decide over them where their investments go.

Even so, there is a very big difference between a collection of the speculative type, comparable to having gold bars in a safe, to a personal collection like the ones that Haba Gallery encourages.

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The lightness with which the “children of the Digital Revolution” have when we move in the virtual world, makes social networks, specifically Instagram and web platforms, our comfort space and therefore the one we trust to discover, choose and to buy. Thus, and according to Hiscox, online art sales have tripled since its boom, approximately 4 years ago. We young people know that the world is not limited to our area of ​​birth or residence, but that, today, we live in a globalized world where there are no borders. The online space allows us to destroy distances, which facilitates the encounter, first virtual and later physical, with artists who are miles away and our chances of connecting with them in another context would be very low.

Still, the exhibition concept in the online world is not yet resolved. There are platforms like Iazzu or PeopleArtfactory.com that, through augmented reality, look for ways to expose digital art. The reality is that it is still a long way to go. If we speak in purely commercial terms, even when young people feel comfortable with online shopping, the bulk of collecting does not trust it yet. It is not a distrust of online galleries or platforms, but rather of the impact generated by a work seen through a screen as opposed to having it in front of it in all its splendor and size.

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Hahaha I have to say yes, but under many quotes. It depends. As an artist the problem is that we are witnessing a surplus of creations, and standing out and therefore succeeding is a complicated issue, but if you manage to run alongside the avant-garde and that people empathize with you, then it is very likely that they will remember your name. .

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